WISCONSIN

With 5.9 million residents, Wisconsin is the 20th largest state in population and, in land area, the state’s 54,310 square miles make it the 25th largest in the nation. The meeting place of three major ecological zones: northern coniferous forests, prairies, and southern hardwood forests, Wisconsin also has wetlands and inexplicable sandstone buttes. It also borders two great lakes and has many smaller lakes itself, most carved by glaciers

Wisconsinites are already witnessing major change to their state’s climate, especially in regards to rising temperatures, drought, and flooding. Already 2°F warmer than it was in the beginning of the 20th century, and  predicted to warm by up to 11°F by mid-century, scientists predict that by 2050 Wisoncins will see two weeks per year with heat indexes above 100°F. Oddly, although Wisconsin is known for its sub-zero winters, extreme heat is actually the #1 weather-related cause of death in the state, accounting for more fatalities than all other weather disasters combined, including tornadoes, floods, and blizzards. 

Warmer air holds more water, leading to more precipitation, especially heavy precipitation. It is not surprising, therefore, that 2019 was the single wettest year on record for Wisconsin, along with the rest of the Midwest. Over the last 30 years, the region has seen a 15% increase in annual precipitation compared to the first half of the twentieth century. 2019’s downpours predictably led to major floods, costing the region $6.2 billion and at least four lives

Although precipitation is expected to only increase as a whole, Wisconsin is still facing a serious drought problem. There may not be more droughts than before, but when they strike they’ll be more intense than ever, only getting worse over time. 

The heat, extreme rain, and harsh droughts have had a devastating effect on agriculture, one of Wisconsin’s most important industries, contributing more than $104.8 billion to the state economy. Over half of Wisconsin’s agricultural revenue comes from the dairy industry, which is seriously impacted by climate change because higher temperatures cause cows to eat less and produce less milk

Wisconsin’s ecosystems are also under attack by climate change altering the composition of forests and  threatening the habitat of endangered species such as the American Marten. Rising water temperatures will shrink the available habitat for coldwater fish such as trout. Declining ice cover and increasingly severe storms add to fish habitat challenges through erosion and flooding.

Climate change is also affecting the rhythm of Wisconsin’s natural systems, affecting the timing of natural processes such as migration, reproduction, and flower blooming. Migratory birds are arriving in the Midwest earlier in spring today than 40 years ago. Along with range shifts, the intricate web of relationships between animals and their food sources and between plants and pollinators are all being disrupted. Because not all species adjust to climate change in the same way, the food that one species eats may no longer be available when that species needs it (for example, when migrating birds arrive). Some types of animals may no longer be able to find enough food.

Fortunately, Wisconsin is taking action against climate change. In 2019, Wisconsin’s governor passed an executive order making Wisconsin the first state in the Midwest to commit to going 100% carbon-free by midcentury. The executive order created novel energy efficiency standards for state facilities, as well as the Office of Sustainability and Clean Energy, a new office established to find the right solutions and technologies to execute this proposal. That includes training Wisconsin’s workforce to build the clean energy sector, as the order lays out. 

In 2021, Madison, Wisconsin moved ahead and set goals to have 100% of its municipal operations’ run with renewable energy by 2030.

Wisconsin does not have any fossil fuel resources of its own, so it ships in coal and natural gas, much of which comes from Wyoming and Montana. As of now, for the first time in decades, coal provided far less than half (31%) of Wisconsin’s electricity generation. Natural gas overtook coal as the biggest energy producer in the state at 40%. Nuclear power is next at 19%, and finally 10% of Wisconsin’s energy comes from renewable energy resources, including hydroelectric power, wind, biomass, and solar. Biomass accounts for the most significant portion of the total because Wisconsin is among the top 10 ethanol-producing states in the nation due to its corn production. Wisconsin produces about 600 million gallons of fuel ethanol every year, and ships much of it across state lines.

Despite its frigid winters, Wisconsin’s energy consumption per capita is actually less than that of nearly half the states and only slightly above the national average. The industrial sector accounts for one-third of the energy consumed in the state, the transportation sector and the residential sector each use nearly one-fourth, and the commercial sector consumes one-fifth.

Wisconsin is one of twenty five states committed to the U.S. Climate Alliance, which is working to implement policies that advance the goals of the Paris Agreement.

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What Climate Change Means for Wisconsin

8/2016
Wisconsin’s climate is changing. In the past century, most of the state has warmed about two degrees (F). Heavy rainstorms are becoming more frequent, and ice cover on the Great Lakes is forming later or…

Clean Wisconsin

From unsafe drinking water to disappearing lakes and streams to threats of increased air pollution, your natural resources and special places need protecting, now more than ever before. That’s where we come in. Using science,…

Climate Wisconsin

Climate Wisconsin is an educational multimedia project featuring stories of climate change. These stories are produced to support teaching and learning about climate change in Wisconsin.

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What Is Killing Wisconsin’s Bald Eagles?

By Rachel Nuwer Photo by Tom Lynn 12/20/2020
When Tony Goldberg received an exuberant, enigmatic text message—“You gotta come into the lab!”—the epidemiologist turned his car around and headed straight back to his office at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He found his…