LEVI’S

IMAGE COURTESY OF: LEVI'S

Levi’s has always been a leader in sustainability. In 1991, it established “terms of engagement” that laid out the brand’s global code of conduct throughout its supply chain. This meant setting standards for worker’s rights, a healthy work environment, and an ethical engagement with the planet.

Today, (counter to what most fast fashion companies are doing) Levi’s is trying to encourage their customers to be conscious that when they purchase a pair of jeans, that is not an isolated event. The garment had an impact before they purchased it, in terms of people that made it and the waste that was involved in creating it. And it’s going to exist long after they’re done owning it.

Paul Dillinger, Levi’s head of global product innovation wondered, What would happen if we could change culture in such a way that consumers imagined the end of life of the product they bought? So, what if we said that you could mulch your jeans, put them in your garden, and see how the decomposition of your Levi’s could feed the food that you were growing. That’s conceivably how we might dispose of garments in the future. That would prompt the consumer to think about little details like how the color was applied to the garment in the first place. Would the chemicals in the dye affect the garment, my food, and my body? This is the kind of holistic thinking Levi’s want to spur in our customers. Fundamentally, asking them to take into account the impact they’re responsible for in the whole system, from the supply chain to the eventual disposal of the garment.

DID YOU KNOW
The documentary “The RiverBlue: Can Fashion Save the Planet?” exposes the environmental disaster created during the process of making denim jeans.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE...

Eileen Fisher

In 1997, before most clothing brands had embraced sustainability and responsibility for the planet, Eileen Fisher’s Amy Hall created their Social Consciousness department. Their mission was to raise awareness about three values: Practicing business responsibly…

Echo Errand Gloves

ounded in 1923 by Edgar and Theresa Hyman in New York City, Echo has been creating colorful scarves and fashion accessories for almost 100 years. Today, the company is responding to the needs of its…

NOTHING NEW SNEAKERS

Nothing New is making a positive impact on the environment by creating shoes from sustainable materials: their sneakers feature a 100% post-consumer recycled plastic upper, and its other components are created from recycled cotton, fishing…

Patagonia

Since 1985, Patagonia has pledged 1% of sales to the preservation and restoration of the natural environment. They’ve awarded over $89 million in cash and in-kind donations to domestic and international grassroots environmental groups making…

allbirds

A native of New Zealand, Tim Brown was always well versed in the magical qualities of merino wool. Inherently curious, he began asking himself why such a remarkable, sustainable resource was virtually absent in the…

Naturepedic Organic Cotton Face Masks

Since 2003, Naturepedic has been on a mission to transform the lives of our customers through safer, healthier sleep. By eliminating materials like flame retardants and polyurethane foam from our line of certified organic natural mattresses,…

ARIELLE

Texas-born designer Arielle launched her eponymous label in 2018 after a series of design gigs at several major ready-to-wear brands which left her disenchanted with the ethics of the fashion industry. Her brand reflects her personal…