REPORTS AND PAPERS

Already by the beginning of June, there were dozens of reports on subjects from air quality to conserving and restoring America’s lands and waters, from melting ice to gas emission inventories, from health consequences to economic consequences.
 
At the end of May, Michael Svoboda at Yale Climate Connections, published a piece outlining 12 reports “on what the U.S. may make possible on climate.”  Perhaps Net Zero by 2050: A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector released by the International Energy Agency, on May 1, is the one you should read first. It is both demanding and optimistic.
 
On August 9, a landmark U.N. report from the IPCC “issued its latest and most dire assessment about the state of the planet, detailing how humans have altered the environment at an “unprecedented” pace and cautioning that the world risks increasingly catastrophic impacts in the absence of rapid greenhouse gas reductions.” As reported in the Washington Post, “the landmark report, compiled by 234 authors relying on more than 14,000 studies from around the globe, bluntly lays out for policymakers and the public the most up-to-date understanding of the physical science on climate change. Released amid a summer of deadly fires, floods and heat waves, it arrives less than three months before a critical summit this November in Scotland, where world leaders face mounting pressure to move more urgently to slow the Earth’s warming.
 
Monday’s sprawling assessment states that there is no remaining scientific doubt that humans are fueling climate change. That much is “unequivocal.” The only real uncertainty that remains, its authors say, is whether the world can muster the will to stave off a darker future than the one it already has carved in stone.”
IPCC-report-graphic-ccr

Credit: Our Daily Planet Graphic by Annabel Driussi for ODP.

2021 REPORTS & PAPERS

GCRMN 10/5/21
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Observation-based early-warning signals for a collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

nature

Observation-based early-warning signals for a collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

By Niklas Boers 8/5/21
The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a major ocean current system transporting warm surface waters toward the northern Atlantic, has been suggested to exhibit two distinct modes of operation. A collapse from the currently attained…
AMOC 8/5/21

Observation-based early-warning signals for a collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

nature

Observation-based early-warning signals for a collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

By Niklas Boers 8/5/21
The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a major ocean current system transporting warm surface waters toward the northern Atlantic, has been suggested to exhibit two distinct modes of operation. A collapse from the currently attained…
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SOTC 8/1/21
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IOP 2021
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