NEW JERSEY

On May 23, 2019, Governor Phil Murphy signed several legislative initiatives relating to a clean energy economy, and also signed an executive order directing the development of an updated Energy Master Plan (EMP) for the state to achieve 100 percent clean energy by 2050.

By June 10, 2019, a Master Plan had been released.

PLANS TO ACCELERATE RENEWABLES

New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program

New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program is a statewide program that offers financial incentives, programs and services for New Jersey residents, business owners and local governments to help them save energy, money and the environment.

New Jersey Energy Master Plan

Clean energy is vital for our future from both an economic development and environmental sustainability policy perspective. With this in mind, Governor Murphy, through Executive Order 28, has set an ambitious goal of setting New Jersey…

KEY RESOURCES

Environment New Jersey

Funded by supporters, they research the challenges confronting our environment and educate the public about what’s at stake. Through research reports, news conferences, interviews with reporters, op-ed pieces, letters to the editor and more, they…

New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program

New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program is a statewide program that offers financial incentives, programs and services for New Jersey residents, business owners and local governments to help them save energy, money and the environment.

NEWS

new jersey cape

New Jersey: Builders Must Now Consider Climate Risks

By Gina-Marie Cheeseman     01/30/2020   
The strategies within the Energy Master Plan include reducing energy use and emissions from the transportation sector. This means encouraging electric vehicle adoption and electrifying transportation systems. Other strategies include accelerating the deployment of renewable…

N.J. rejoins Northeast cap-and-trade program

By Adam Aton     6/17/19   
New Jersey today rejoined the Northeast’s Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, adding the country’s eighth-largest economy to a cap-and-trade regime that already encompassed about one-fifth of the United States’ gross domestic product.