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In America’s fastest-growing metro, a rising fear water will run out

By Karin Brulliard Photo: Bridget Bennett, The Washington Post

A century after her grandfather arrived to eke a living out of the hot, red dirt here, Susan Savage still structures her life around the groundwater. Twice daily, she checks the well her family’s pasturelands, orchards and animals depend on, watching its level drop in recent years amid punishing drought.

08/15/22
                                                               

With California expected to lose 10% of its water within 20 years, Newsom calls for urgent action

By Ian James

With California enduring historic drought amplified by global warming, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday released a new plan to adapt to the state’s hotter, drier future by capturing and storing more water, recycling more wastewater and desalinating seawater and salty groundwater.

08/11/22
                                                               

As Drought Hits Farms, Investors Lay Claim to Colorado Water

By Jennifer Oldham Photo: Sarah Gilman

Michael Jones ducked under an idle sprinkler and strode across the sandy soil where he planned to plant drought-resistant crops, hoping to save water amid the driest period in more than 1,200 years.
For the fourth-generation grower, sowing fewer, higher-value plants on this tiny organic farm was borne out of necessity: In 2018, his irrigation ditches ran dry. Farmers in Colorado’s San Luis Valley rely on such ditches, which are fed by snowmelt and rain that run into cottonwood lined creeks that flow out of two towering mountain ranges, the Sangre de Cristos and the San Juans. But that snowmelt dropped by 40 percent over the last four decades. The six-county region is now among the harshest places to farm in the West. Federal officials designated it a disaster area in April due to its extremely arid conditions

08/10/22
                                                               

Saltwater toilets, desperate wildlife: Water-starved Catalina Island battles against drought

By Hayley Smith Photo: Francine Orr

Island-dweller Lori Snell grimaced as she tallied her bill recently at the Avalon Laundry — nearly $50 for three large loads. “It’s always an adventure to live in Catalina,” said Snell, 64. “It’s a joy, it’s a paradise, it’s a challenge.”

08/05/22
                                                               

See How Far Water Levels in Lake Mead Have Fallen

By Winston Choi-Schagrin Photo: David Becker, Reuters

In 2000, Lake Mead was full of deep, midnight-blue water that flooded the banks of the rivers that fed it. But 20 years later, it has shrunken drastically. And its basins are lighter, too, almost teal in places, a sign of increasingly shallow waters connected by extraordinarily skinny canyons.

07/22/22
                                                               

Revealed: US water likely contains more ‘forever chemicals’ than EPA tests show

By Tom Perkins Photo: Massimo Percossi/EPA

A Guardian analysis of water samples from around the United States shows that the type of water testing relied on by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is so limited in scope that it is probably missing significant levels of PFAS pollutants.

07/06/22
                                                               

Colorado River: Serving as the “lifeline of the Southwest”

Serving as the “lifeline of the Southwest,” and one of the most heavily regulated rivers in the world, the Colorado River provides water to 35 million people and more than 4 million acres of farmland in a region encompassing some 246,000 square miles.

06/03/22
                                                               

Why a Global Price on Freshwater Might be Needed in the Climate Change Era

By Ciara Nugent Photo: Natalie Behring , Getty Images

Do you pay for the water you use? The answer may seem like an obvious “yes”—you probably get a water bill every month, charging you a cent or two for every gallon that comes out of the taps in your home. In the U.S., an average family of four, consuming 100 gallons of water each per day, paid $73 a month for water in 2019 (accounting for wide variations across states and cities). But those dollar and gallon amounts are almost completely divorced from the true impact of our lives on the world’s water resources.

05/31/22
                                                               

As pollution worsens on Cape Cod, some are investing hopes in a new type of septic system

By David Abel Photo: Jonathan Wiggs , Globe Staff

For years, pollution from septic systems has spawned algae blooms, toxic bacteria, and a putrid scum coating the waters of Cape Cod, destroying vital ecosystems, contributing to coastal erosion, and harming tourism.

05/17/22