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Category: ARIZONA_CN CALIFORNIA_CN COLORADO_CN CONSEQUENCES_WATER_LAKES AND RIVERS LAKES & RIVERS_CN NEVADA_CN NM_CN UTAH_CN WATER_CN

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The Colorado River is in crisis, and it’s getting worse every day

By Erin Patrick O'Connor Photo: Matt McClain

It is a powerhouse: a 1,450-mile waterway that stretches from the Rocky Mountains to the Sea of Cortez, serving 40 million people in seven U.S. states, 30 federally recognized tribes and Mexico. It hydrates 5 million acres of agricultural land and provides critical habitat for rare fish, birds and plants.

05/14/22
                                                               

The swift march of climate change in North Carolina’s ‘ghost forests’

By Brady Dennis Photo: Carolyn Von Houten , The Washington Post

ALLIGATOR RIVER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, N.C. — As the first light of day flickers across the Croatan Sound, Scott Lanier surveys the gray, barren tree trunks that stand in every direction, like massive gravestones marking the once-vibrant landscape.

05/12/22
                                                               
PEW

Carbon Captured by Coastal and Ocean Habitats Can Advance States’ Climate Goals

By Sylvia Troost Photo: Laura Brophy

Coastal wetlands support a huge range of life on Earth and provide the major benefit of capturing and storing carbon—so-called “blue carbon.” Conserving and restoring these ecosystems can contribute to broader efforts that combat climate change.

03/28/22
                                                               

PEAT, KELP AND TREES: NATURE-BASED CARBON CAPTURE

By Greg Dalton

Many climate efforts focus on carbon capture from power plants and refineries – preventing emissions before they reach the atmosphere. But even if we dramatically reduce emissions in the years ahead, we still need to deal with all the carbon dioxide already in the sky.

03/04/22
                                                               

Colorado River, stolen by law

By Pauly Denetclaw Photo: Gabriella Trujillo/High Country News

Indigenous nations have been an afterthought in U.S. water policy for over a century. That was all part of the plan.

03/01/22
                                                               

On the Great Lakes, scientists are making a ‘Winter Grab’ of rare data

By Susan Cosier Photo: Susan Cosier

On a brutally cold day here earlier this week, Kirill Shchapov stood 200 meters off the shore of Lake Michigan, using a green auger to drill into a glistening ice sheet that stretched to the horizon. A fountain of water erupted when he yanked the auger from the hole. But soon Shchapov, a limnologist at the University of Minnesota (UM), Duluth, and other researchers were busily lowering nets and instruments through the opening, collecting water samples and shellfish that lived on the lake floor some 5 meters down.

02/18/22
                                                               

NC’s salt marshes hold 64 million tons of carbon dioxide. What happens if they die?

By Adam Wagner Photo: Travis Long

On a recent weekend, a family went fishing feet away from a salt marsh in the northwest corner of Carolina Beach State Park, about 20 minutes south of downtown Wilmington.

10/25/21
                                                               
Pew

Writer Delia Owens Discusses the Need to Conserve Salt Marsh

By Delia Owens Photo: Richard Ellis , Alamy Photo Stock

Delia Owens knows a lot about salt marsh from her time spent studying zoology at the University of Georgia and her experience living in North Carolina. And she’s incorporated salt marsh as a central element in her writing, showcasing these vibrant and abundant coastal wetlands that provide essential habitat for birds, fish, and other wildlife.

10/25/21
                                                               
PEW

Seafood, Seagrass, and Storms: North Carolina Plan Would Protect Coast—and Livelihoods

By Leda Cunningham Photo: Anne Chamberlain Getty Images

Bordered in part by a thin chain of barrier islands—the Outer Banks—the sounds, shorelines, and marshes of North Carolina’s coast form one of the largest estuary systems in the country. The seagrass found in its vast underwater meadows is unusually diverse, consisting of species found to the south and the north, but nowhere else together. The coast is also home to a wide array of wildlife that depends on this habitat year-round.

10/12/21
                                                               
PEW

Coastal ‘Blue Carbon’: An Important Tool for Combating Climate Change

By Stacy Baez Photo: Wolfgang Kaehler Getty Images

Coastal wetlands, including salt marshes, mangrove forests, and seagrass meadows, are among the most productive—and threatened—ecosystems on the planet. They provide many benefits to people and nature, such as helping communities adapt to severe storms, flooding, and other climate-related threats and sequestering carbon from the water and atmosphere in their branches, leaves, roots, and underlying soils. These carbon stores are known as “blue carbon” because they are located in places where the land meets the sea. However, these wetland habitats have lost more than a third of their area over the past half-century.

09/20/21