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Category: Green_Kitchens_CN Health_Pollution_CN NEWS_ARCHIVE

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Your gas stove is dangerous to your health

By Wynne Armand

In January, groundbreaking research from Stanford showed that gas stoves release concerning levels of indoor air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides “within a few minutes of usage” and continuously leak methane even when they are off.

07/16/22
                                                               

How wildfires impact our health, as well as the environment

By Jamie Hailstone Photo: AFP via Getty Images

It is a sad truth that many parts of the world – including various parts of the United States – are now facing an increased risk of wildfires.

07/13/22
                                                               

Pollution from California’s 2020 wildfires likely offset decades of air quality gains

By Tony Briscoe Photo: Brian Van Der Brug , Los Angeles Times

In an analysis published this week in the annual Air Quality Life Index, researchers found that wildfire smoke probably offset decades of state and federal antipollution efforts, at least temporarily.

06/17/22
                                                               

Block-by-block data shows pollution’s stark toll on people of color

By Darryl Fears Photo: Jane Tyska/Digital First Media/East Bay Times/Getty Images

Finding the most polluted places in the San Francisco Bay area is simple, a new air quality analysis shows: Locate places where mostly Black, Latino, Asian and low-income residents live, and pay them a visit.

05/25/22
                                                               

Pollution caused 1 in 6 deaths globally for five years, study says

By Kasha Patel Photo: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg News

In 2015, 1 in 6 deaths worldwide stemmed from poor air quality, unsafe water and toxic chemical pollution. That deadly toll — 9 million people each year — has continued unabated through 2019, killing more people than war, terrorism, road injuries, malaria, drugs and alcohol.

05/17/22
                                                               

Switching to electric vehicles could save lives, study finds

By Jamie Hailstone Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Moving to zero-emission vehicles and energy could help prevent up to 110,000 deaths in the United States, according to a new report.

03/30/22
                                                               

EPA announces ‘bold’ action to monitor pollution in ‘Cancer Alley’

By Darryl Fears Photo: AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Two months after touring “environmental justice” communities in three southern states, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Regan on Wednesday announced bold steps to address complaints from residents about tainted drinking water, chemical plants near homes and a school, and breathing toxic air.

01/26/22
                                                               

Hospitals try to curb astronomical emissions as pandemic brings new challenges

By Yara L. Murr

Lois Wessel used to work as a labor and delivery nurse in community clinics in Maryland. She remembers that every time a baby was born, she would see a beautiful little creature – and then she’d see a whole big bag full of garbage, of sheets, supplies packaging and tubing.

04/07/21
                                                               

Climate change has direct negative impacts on farmworker health

By Lela Nargi Photo: Sandy Huffaker , Getty Images

Research confirms the various ways that climate impacts on food and agriculture are adversely affecting our health: Rising CO2 levels lead to less nutritious cropsincreased incidence of diseases and pests may cause some farmers to use more toxic on-farm chemicals;

03/30/21
                                                               

Rising CO2 will leave crops—and millions of humans—less healthy

By Brian Bienkowski Photo by Dương Trí/Unsplash

Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will render some major crops less nutritious and leave hundreds of millions of people protein and zinc deficient over the next three decades, according to a new study.

08/28/18