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Category: ClimateJustice_MN FARMING_MN Fossil_Coal_MN

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Black Farmers Are Rebuilding Agriculture in Coal Country

By Natalie Peart

While most people associate West Virginia with coal mining, the hills and valleys are also suited for agriculture. And as coal production wanes, farmers are seeing growing opportunities to expand their sector.

01/10/22
                                                               

Regeneratively Grazed : As Nature Intended

200 years ago, massive herds of bison would number in the thousands and sometimes hundreds of thousands of head. Constantly on the move, these massive bison herds would leave behind a path of devastation and may not return for a year or more.

01/04/22
                                                               

A frenzy of well drilling by California farmers leaves taps running dry

By Maria L. La Ganga, Gabrielle LaMarr LeMee and Ian James Photo: Irfan Khan

Vicki McDowell woke up on a Saturday morning in May, thinking about what she would make her son for breakfast. He was visiting from Hayward, and she wanted to whip up something special. Biscuits and gravy. Fried potatoes. Eggs.

12/16/21
                                                               

Kelp Farming Gets a Boost in Suffolk

By Christopher Walsh

Gov. Kathy Hochul signed legislation on Tuesday permitting Suffolk County to lease underwater lands previously ceded to it by New York State for the purpose of kelp and other seaweed cultivation.

12/09/21
                                                               

Solar and crop production research shows ‘multi-solving’ climate benefits

By Martin Bonzi and Sarah Spengeman

Stabilizing the climate demands a rapid transition to 100 percent carbon-free power, which will require large increases in solar power generation. In the U.S., the Biden administration has outlined a plan to power 40 percent of the U.S. power grid with solar energy by 2035…

12/01/21
                                                               

The Latest Farm Product: Carbon Credits

By Elizabeth G. Dunn Photo: Rachel Mummey , The New York Times

Eight years ago, Kevin Prevo started making changes to the land in southern Iowa that his family has farmed for five generations. Mr. Prevo stopped tilling the fields between crop cycles and started planting cover crops he does not harvest — a mix including rye, turnips, radishes and sunflowers — between rotations of his cash crops, corn, soybeans and rye.

11/23/21
                                                               

Georgia farmers experiment with new crops as the climate changes

By YCC Team

Summer is the time to enjoy fresh, delicious peaches from Georgia. But winter weather is key to a good harvest. Peach trees need a period of cold to bloom well and produce abundant fruit. The same is true of blueberries.

11/05/21
                                                               

Climate challenges mount for California agriculture

By Jan Ellen Spiegel

California agriculture has experienced just about every form of climate change-induced calamity: Heat, drought, fire, floods. None bodes well for the future of farming in this state that is the U.S. king of agriculture.

10/29/21
                                                               

New Mexico’s Chile Pepper Farmers Feel the Heat of Climate Change

By Wufei Yu

In the village of Hatch, New Mexico, at a chile shop cloaked in red ristras — the ornamental strings of chiles that often adorn doorways and windows in the state — Jessie Moreno, the young farmer who owns the store, tallies up sales, offers free samples and cranks an iron basket-topped chile roaster.

10/26/21
                                                               

A recipe for fighting climate change and feeding the world

By Sarah Kaplan Photo: Chase Castor

“It’s so different from anything I’ve baked with,” says my baking partner, Jenny Starrs. We’re standing in the tiny kitchen of my D.C. apartment, examining palmfuls of a dark, coarse, rich-scented flour. It’s unfamiliar because it was milled from Kernza, a grain that is fundamentally unlike all other wheat humans grow.

10/12/21