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The Colorado River is in crisis, and it’s getting worse every day

By Erin Patrick O'Connor Photo: Matt McClain

It is a powerhouse: a 1,450-mile waterway that stretches from the Rocky Mountains to the Sea of Cortez, serving 40 million people in seven U.S. states, 30 federally recognized tribes and Mexico. It hydrates 5 million acres of agricultural land and provides critical habitat for rare fish, birds and plants.

05/14/22
                                                               

Colorado River, stolen by law

By Pauly Denetclaw Photo: Gabriella Trujillo/High Country News

Indigenous nations have been an afterthought in U.S. water policy for over a century. That was all part of the plan.

03/01/22
                                                               

The battle for Lake Michigan: As beaches erode, millions of dollars have been poured into temporary solutions. Can anyone find a long-term fix?

By Patrick M. O' Connell Photo: Zbigniew Bzdak , Chicago Tribune

 As the wind whipped across the top of the Big Sable Point lighthouse, one of the most famous and beloved on the Great Lakes, Jim Gallie pointed to the disappearing beach: “It’s been progressively getting worse.”

11/20/20

Q: What about our freshwater lakes and rivers?

A: As air temperatures rise, water temperatures do also—particularly in shallow stretches of rivers and surface waters of lakes. Streams and lakes may become unsuitable for cold-water fish.  In a warming climate, a warmer upper layer in deep lakes slows down air exchange—a process that normally adds oxygen to the water. This, in turn, often creates large “dead zones”—areas depleted of oxygen and unable to support life. More at Union of Concerned Scientists

11/05/20