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Titanium dioxide coating could keep roads and bike paths cooler

By YCC Team Photo: Jonathan Cutrer

Biking or walking on a hot day can make you feel like you’re in an oven because dark pavement absorbs and retains heat. But applying a special coating to streets and bike paths could help cool them off.
Nicole Iroz-Elardo is an urban planning and public health researcher. She’s part of a University of Arizona-led team that’s testing a product made with titanium dioxide.

10/18/22
                                                               

Disconnected and ‘dehumanized’: How thousands across Phoenix survive without running water

By Zayna Syed Photo: Antranik Tavitian, The Republic

Tim Wiedman caught COVID-19 last December. A few days later, he developed bronchitis. A double whammy, he called it. The illnesses sapped his energy so much that, for six weeks, he could barely get off the living room couch in the two-bedroom apartment he shares with his mom in Mesa.
The illnesses sapped his energy so much that, for six weeks, he could barely get off the living room couch in the two-bedroom apartment he shares with his mom in Mesa.

09/11/22
                                                               

Facing ‘dead pool’ risk, California braces for painful water cuts from Colorado River

By Ian James Photo: Luis Sinco, Los Angeles Times

California water districts are under growing pressure to shoulder substantial water cutbacks as the federal government pushes for urgent solutions to prevent the Colorado River’s badly depleted reservoirs from reaching dangerously low levels.

09/04/22
                                                               

The Fight Over The Colorado River’s Water Is A Symbol Of The Larger Climate Crisis

By Alejandro De La Garza

There’s something familiar about the high stakes water use drama playing out in the U.S. Southwest.
The mighty Colorado River serves as an economic artery of the region, powering massive hydroelectric dams and supplying water to farmers and rapidly growing cities across the region. But continued overuse during a massive yearslong megadrought—the driest stretch the area has experienced in more than a millennia—has caused water reservoir levels to fall to unprecedented lows, imperiling water supplies and the operation of crucial power plants.

08/29/22
                                                               

A New Round of Colorado River Cuts Is Announced

By Henry Fountain Photo: caitlin Ochs, Reuters

With water levels in the Colorado River near their lowest point ever, Arizona and Nevada on Tuesday faced new restrictions on the amount of water they can pump out of the river, the most important in the Southwest.
And the threat of more cuts looms. This week, those two states along with five others failed to meet a deadline for agreement on much steeper cuts in water use, raising the prospect that the federal government will step in and mandate further reductions.

08/16/22
                                                               

See How Far Water Levels in Lake Mead Have Fallen

By Winston Choi-Schagrin Photo: David Becker, Reuters

In 2000, Lake Mead was full of deep, midnight-blue water that flooded the banks of the rivers that fed it. But 20 years later, it has shrunken drastically. And its basins are lighter, too, almost teal in places, a sign of increasingly shallow waters connected by extraordinarily skinny canyons.

07/22/22
                                                               

A Painful Deadline Nears as Colorado River Reservoirs Run Critically Low

By Henry Fountain Photo: Justin Sullivan, Getty Images

States in the Colorado River basin are scrambling to propose steep cuts in the water they’ll use from the river next year, in response to a call by the federal government for immediate, drastic efforts to keep the river’s main storage reservoirs from reaching critically low levels.

07/21/22
                                                               

Recent rain allows forests in US Southwest to reopen

Photo: Mike Sorensen , AP

The monsoon has delivered much-needed moisture to the parched region and relief from scorching temperatures. Forecasters say Arizona has a good chance of getting above-average rain through the season that runs through September. New Mexico has equal chances of above, below and normal rainfall.

06/24/22
                                                               

Arizona wildfires gut observatory buildings, endanger artifacts

By Marisa Iati Photo: Rachel Gibbons/Arizona Daily Sun/AP

In the latest example of the expanding reach of wildfires, a trio of blazes in Arizona has gutted several buildings at a national observatory, forced the evacuation of a historical monument and threatened other archaeological artifacts.

06/23/22