CARS

The transportation sector generates the largest share of greenhouse gas emissions: 29%. Cars are approximately 58% of that.

Over 90% of the fuel used for transportation is petroleum based, which includes primarily gasoline and diesel. As we move to reduce our use of those fossil fuels and accelerate our use of renewables–“greening” our electrical grid– electric vehicles are inevitable.

In August, 2021, President Biden signed an executive order on Strengthening American Leadership in Clean Cars and Trucks, which sets a nonbinding target of making 50 percent of passenger cars and light-duty trucks zero emission vehicles by 2030. The executive order also directs EPA and NHTSA to develop standards for fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles as well as passenger cars for model years 2027–2030, to be finalized by December 2022.

There are many reasons for you to consider going electric…

  • EVs are better for the environment, producing significantly fewer emissions, and reducing air pollution as well as mitigating climate change.
  • They are as safe, if not safer than gasoline and diesel-powered cars.
  • They are cheaper and easier to maintain, with fewer parts, no engine, no oil, less brake wear and parts that require little or no regular maintenance. According to Consumer Reports (Sept 2020), you can expect to save an average of $4,600 in repair and maintenance over the life of an EV. Some details from RepairPal: “ typical maintenance items on EVs include the cabin air filters that keep outside dust and particulate out of a car’s heating and air conditioning system; brake pads, tires, and suspension components, such as shock absorbers; ball joints; and steering tie rod ends. An EV has a cooling system that uses antifreeze, similar to what would be found in a gasoline engine’s radiator, but because there is no danger of contamination by engine oil or combustion byproducts, it doesn’t break down and seldom needs to be changed. Regenerative braking systems found on EVs and some hybrids use resistance from the electric motors to slow the vehicle, so brake pads don’t see as much use as they would in a gasoline-powered car. Replacing a battery pack costs approximately $5,500 but they tend to last 8-10 years.”
  • Warranties tend to be longer. 8-10 years or 100,000 miles.
  • You can receive rebates and tax credits with purchase, potential federal tax credits of up to $7,500 and potentially from cities and states as well.
  • No more pumping gas. Plug in at home or, if on a long road trip, at a fast charger. Map here. If you own a Tesla or a business that wants to install a Tesla supercharger, check this out.
  • More options all the time, from major car makers, including Audi, Ford, Chevrolet, Hyundai, Porsche, Tesla, Toyota, Volkswagen.

It’s useful, when thinking about making a transition to electric, to look at the whole process, from manufacturing to disposal. In a recent Forbes article covering this, it was concluded, after viewing numerous studies (including The International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) report in July 2021) that battery-electric vehicles have the lowest lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. And, the article contended that, as the electricity supply “greens” with solar and wind power being added to the mix, it will only get better.

SOURCE: EPA

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